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Design, Digested 47 – Privacy, dreamhouses, the woman behind the author

The illusion of privacy, Barbie dreamhouses, Eileen O’Shaughnessy, the benefits of desk research and more.

Earlier this month, Molly Holzschlag, known as the fairy godmother of the web, died. She was a pioneer in online web standards and accessibility. RIP. Read Eric Meyer’s Memories of Molly.

Apple vs Meta: the illusion of privacy

Growth design’s case study on the UX of privacy policies.

A11y Cat: digital accessibility resources

A collection of accessibility links for professionals who work with digital accessibility.

PlayStation’s accessibility controller launches this December

The controller was designed to remove barriers to gaming and help players with disabilities play more easily, more comfortably, and for longer periods on PS5.

How to use desk research to kick-start your design process

Desk research is usually employed when looking for inspiration or benchmarking. Teisanu Tudor explains how, in academia, this first step is revised multiple times and has a critical role in the process.

Six Barbie Dreamhouses that chart the evolution of the American home

Toymaker Mattel and architecture magazine Pin-Up have released a book celebrating Barbie’s Dreamhouse to mark its 60th anniversary.

Looking for Eileen: how George Orwell wrote his wife out of his story

Anna Funder, author of the bestseller Stasiland, has written a book about Eileen O’Shaughnessy, a compelling figure strangely absent from her husband’s writing.

Whichbook

Whichbook is a free resource run by Opening the Book. Their team of 40 readers pick a wide, diverse range as possible, with attention to books that don’t have big marketing budgets.

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